Gilly Reads

Top 5 Australian Literary Magazines

on australian, top five, literary magazines, essay, the lifted brow, meanjin, seizure, dumbo feather, overland, australian writing

magazine stack
I'm a big fan of literary magazines, by which I simply mean magazines that publish predominantly writing. I love reading essays about all sorts of topics. Australia has a lot of excellent writers, and despite not a lot of money in the industry, a fair number of magazines to publish their work. In fact, people continue to start up literary magazines regularly. I'd really love a way to pay for content from a bunch of different magazines because I can't afford to subscribe to more than one, and so, because I want to read a variety, I just buy copies ever now and then. Here are a few of my favourite sources for a great piece of writing:

  1. The Lifted Brow has an app has a great user interface. The print magazine is published quarterly and a digital version is published monthly, in parts. I have been reading the sample issue on the app at the moment.
  2. Meanjin is 75 years old, and is a very traditional in concept (essay, poetry, fiction, memoire). I love trawling through the website to find interesting reads. It can be a real time drain but super fascinating. The print version is published quarterly. Pieces are later put up online.
  3. Seizure is a recent find for me. I met the founder at a stall at Noted, and looked it up. I found a treasure trove and have been reading ever since. It is now only published digitally, but back issues can be bought in print.
  4. Dumbo Feather is a magazine I always buy in print. It's full over interviews with interesting people, their tagline is "Conversations with extraordinary people" which is apt. It is published quarterly in print.
  5. Overland is also published quarterly, and digitally on its website. The print copy is always very visually appealing, but I generally read digitally.
Here are a few pieces I've particularly liked:

Fatima Measham (a favourite of mine) wrote this fantastic essay about postcode superiority and living in Werribee.
Hugh Rundle wrote this piece for Overland about Trove (the Australian National Library digitisation/open access project) and it's importance to Australia.
Kaitlyn Plyley wrote How to Talk to Sick People over on Seizure which is great.
I wouldn't really call The Conversation a literary magazine, but this is an excellent piece about Australia and the language used about our history.

top five literary magazine covers

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